Soccer Articles

USA vs. Japan

Written by: Matt Weiss

Soccer is a strange and unpredictable sport, which makes it so fun...and so agonizing at the same time. Recently, World Cup Finals at the senior levels have been very low scoring, especially early in the games, due to the conservative approach of both teams. In the past 2 Men's World Cup Finals, a 117th minute goal by Andres Iniesta as Spain beat Netherlands 1-0, and a 113th minute goal for Mario Gotze as Germany beat Argentina 1-0 were the only goals scored in the final.

We were in for a treat yesterday when the USWNT had already scored 4 goals after just 20 minutes of play. In tournaments, the result is really the only thing that matters, so as amazing of an accomplishment as it was, here are a few observations that are important to discuss.

Soccer is a game of ups and downs. When Japan gave up a goal in the 3rd minute (which is already bad enough), and then another goal 2 minutes later, they continued to let the US control every aspect of the game. It wasn't until the 3rd goal, after a poor clearance by their defense, that they decided to huddle up as a team and communicate. I would argue that this should have happened definitely after the 2nd goal but maybe even after the first! People always say that a 2-0 lead is dangerous in soccer, but in truth, a 2-0 lead is only dangerous for the team with zero goals, statistics have shown that across the top leagues, when you are up 2 goals, you win a lot of the time. Of course, just a few minutes after the 3rd goal, arguably the goal of the tournament came next, a half field bomb to make it 4-0. When things are not going your way, changes need to happen immediately, or you can find yourself losing the World Cup in just 20 minutes...

If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. At 4-0, and after Carli Lloyd's missed header to almost make it 5-0, the game completely changed. The US took their foot off the pedal and Japan started to control the game. The US had such an early advantage with their size and speed that Japan could not build at all. But after the 4th goal, and the US dropped back to defend, Japan quickly made it a mission to just play and work towards that first goal. Their goal was created when Alex Morgan slacked off her pressing duties, allowing Japan to switch the attack in the back, find the flank, and cross it in for a turn and finish from the striker. Now 4-1, the US became nervous and Japan knew "if we can get it to 4-2 by half, we will be fine". The US allowed Japan to settle into their style and go into halftime with confidence, even though they were down 4-1. In my opinion, with the depth the US has, they should have continued to press, starting from the forwards, and do their best to drain all hope from the Japanese. I'm sure some of you were thinking about the 7-1 beating that Germany gave Brazil in last summer's World Cup. If you watch that game again, you will see that Germany continued playing their style for the entire 90 minutes, never allowing Brazil to even have hope of coming back.

Defense wins championships. As a former striker, I never liked admitting this, but it is 100% true. The US were very boring to watch in the group stage, and struggled a bit in the knockout round as well. Alex Morgan struggled in the majority of the games. They had multiple 0-0 halftime scores and were very predictable (and too direct) in their attack at times. Thankfully, the defense was tremendous and always gave the US an opportunity to win the game. People tend to not recognize the defensive efforts (aside from the back 4 and Hope Solo) that players like Carli Lloyd, Tobin Heath, and Morgan Brian put in, especially after they (or their teammates) lost the ball. The irony, as I said earlier, is when the US put all their focus into defending against Japan (after the 4-0 lead), that is when they played their worst defense all tournament! With their athleticism and speed, pressing opponents and winning the ball back as soon as possible was their best defensive approach and helped spark their attack, which they improved every game after group play and was enough to put Japan away and get that third star on the jersey.

Matt Weiss
Matt Weiss

Director of Soccer

Posted by Administrator on Mon, 6 Jul 2015
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Things That Last

At the end of the each season, it is normal to try to take inventory of what was gained or lost over the course of the year. Each athlete who participates in sports gains something throughout the season. Either the player improved his ability and skill, understanding of how to play, became psychologically a tougher competitor, or grew stronger and faster. These are all important aspects of a player’s development that the player will be able to apply to the next season which will help him have more success in the coming years. In addition, we hope the player loves the game more now than when the season started, and that his hunger and joy to play have both grown and are insatiable.

But what about when there is not a next season? What about when the player is done competing, and playing sports is something that is in the rear-view mirror? At that point, what will the player take with him to help him move on to the next step in life? In other words… what really lasts? When there are no more games to play, here are a couple things that will stay with any athlete who had the courage to compete and learn how to play a game:

Active and Healthy Lifestyle

This may be the most obvious, but it is one of the most important things that lasts from playing sports, or I hope lasts for all players, as it positively affects all other areas of an athlete’s life. By playing sports, players tend to learn a great deal about the benefits of exercise, eating right, getting enough sleep, and other healthy habits. This may be more true in some sports than others, but the hope is that the feeling of being in good shape, working hard, getting a good sweat, and that rush from pushing harder and a little farther than you thought was possible never goes away. In a small way, staying active is an avenue a former athlete can use to still compete, either against others or himself.

When an athlete leaves a hard practice or game, there is sense of accomplishment. A great feeling of how the body was pushed and feels stronger. Sometimes after a great game or training session, athletes feel like they can accomplish anything. It is a feeling athletes try to recreate by staying active or seeking out new physical challenges.

As a coach, this is one thing I really hope sticks for all players. I hope they stay active, and do not allow themselves to let unhealthy habits overcome healthy ones and an active lifestyle they have spent most of their lives being a part of in sports. Outside the lessons and skills of the game, these lessons, I believe are some of the most important for athletes to learn as they can be used throughout the rest of their lives.

Ability to Struggle Positively

Over the course of a playing career, all players will struggle... often. It is part of playing sports. It is expected, and overtime, athletes learn how to struggle positively. They embrace the struggle, look forward to it, feed off it, and understand it is required to improve. In fact, when there is no struggle, and there is no turmoil, it can cause more unrest as the athlete becomes concerned there is no opportunity for growth. They seek out the struggle. They look for paths of the most resistance rather than the least resistance. Not because they don’t know how to work smarter than others, but they know that usually the path of least resistance does not lead them to where they want to go. As it never has before.

With this in mind, athletes develop the skills required to struggle positively. They do not get bogged down or quit when things get hard. They struggle with a smile, and they learn to do it playing the game they love. It is not something they were taught. They had to do it in order to survive on the playing field, and it is what is required to survive the game of "life."

The Need to Help Others

Being a part of a team develops a need to help others that becomes a part of who players are for the rest of their lives. For a team to be successful, everyone must help one another to earn success as a group. A player learns to recognize success, not in just what they accomplish, but what they can help and inspire others to accomplish. To be able to help someone else achieve something they could not do on their own, is more rewarding than any other type of individual accomplishment. To feel whole, to feel successful, can only be achieved by helping others do the same.

This need to serve a greater cause outside of their own interests is part of why former athletes are often very active in their communities and serving others. It is what helped them be successful when they played, and it is what will help them be successful when they are done playing making influential contributions in their communities.

Willingness to Accept Help

This is the flip side of helping others on a team. Being a part of a team, a player needs to accept help from others. They learn they can achieve more with the help of others than they could ever do on their own. Many people refuse to accept help from others as they see it as a sign of weakness or openly admitting they cannot do it alone.

Through playing on a team, a player learns that accepting help is a sign of strength, and an indication of a greater understanding of what it takes to accomplish extraordinary things. They do not just accept help when offered, they often seek it out. Again, when talking about sports and teamwork, the willingness to help others and the willingness to accept help are two key habits that will benefit players for the rest of their lives.

Competition

The ability and willingness to compete is a necessary characteristic of any successful individual. This is not defined by an overwhelming need to win, but the courage to try to reach beyond what they are currently capable of doing, moving into an uncomfortable place, where they could fail. In short, being competitive means they have the courage to take risks. They have the courage to lose, and know how to overcome it. That is what defines a "competitive" person, and it is something I hope all athletes take away from the competition of sports.

Through sports, kids learn how to compete. They do not shy away from what is hard because they might fail. Instead, the embrace the difficulty and do their best even if it is not good enough win. They do not have a fear of failure. They have a fear of what would happen if they did not even try, and that is what it means to compete.

What it Means to Love

I saved this for last as I feel it is one of the most important things players learn from sports. It is often believed that loving something is easy, it only comes with happy feelings, and is only part of the best moments of your life. What is not talked about is the other side of love. The side of loving something that brings heart-ache and the hardest times a person will go through. With the highs and the joy, comes the deepest lows and indescribable anguish.

But that is what it means to love. To love something, you are willing to sacrifice for it, and even when it hurts you the most, your commitment to what you love never waivers. For something you do not love, maybe something you just “like” a lot, you will quickly walk away from it when things get hard or you do not get anything in return. But that is not love. To love something you give it your all without expecting anything in return.

Players who truly love to play a game learn this lesson, and understand how and what it takes to love. Often the game is their first love, and they are protective of it and committed to it. It gives them great pleasure and happiness to play, and even on their worst days, they would never want to be anywhere else. Overtime, they find out the reward for loving something so deeply is not what they get in return, but what they are able to give because of how much they love.

For me, this is the most important thing that can last from a child’s experience playing sports once all of their seasons are over.

Tony Earp
Tony Earp

Director Tony has a Masters in Education from The Ohio State University, is a State Certified teacher, and is a USSF C License coach. Tony was a standout player both academically and athletically at The Ohio State University, earning multiple honors both on the field and in the classroom. Tony's achievements included 2nd Team All Big Ten in 2001 and 2002, serving as Captain in 2002. Tony was named Most Inspirational Player in 2001 and 2002, as well as achieving Scholar Athlete status in those same years. Tony was a member of the 2002 MLS Draft Pool. After playing, Tony was a history teacher at Licking Valley High School in 2005 and at Dublin Scioto High School in 2006. In 2007, Tony Earp accepted a position at SuperKick as the Director of Soccer Training where he continues to serve as the Senior Director of Training managing programs, establishing training curriculums, and coaching athletes. Tony was the Head Coach for Hilliard Bradley High School boys soccer program in 2009 and 2010. In addition, Tony is a Director for Classics Eagles FC and is the Director of the SuperKick Classics Juniors Academy. With 10 years of coaching experience, Tony has developed a reputation of being a coach who motivates players to expect more from themselves and creates a training environment conducive to developing high level players.

Posted by Administrator on Tue, 2 Jun 2015
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The Wrong Message

This article is in response to a disheartening conversation I had with a local youth soccer coach. He is part of a club who is trying to do the right things for the youngest age groups by providing a playing and training experiences that are age and developmentally appropriate. They are trying to create an environment where players can flourish while learning to play this game. They are providing a platform for games and training that goes against traditional leagues and archaic approaches used by many. For as much progress as I feel we are making in our community and across the country, I am continuously baffled by adults who not only want to put kids in an environment that is inappropriate for their age and level of play, but consistently send kids the wrong message that I feel is detrimental to their development on and off the soccer field.

In short, the coach has arranged inter-squad games for all the teams in the club’s age group. The kids are intermixed among teams and play games against one another. The coaches referee the games, and use the opportunity to stop the games at teachable moments to help the kids learn. This type of game environment is fantastic for the young age groups as it allows them to compete against and with different players, and expand their understanding of how to play the game. The coaches can influence the games to make sure the environment is developmentally appropriate and challenging for the players.

Upon hearing that these were inter-squad friendlies, the coach received many emails and calls from parents letting him know that their child would not be there. The most common reason given to the coach was, “It is not a real game, so I do not think it is important.”

If you need a visual image of my reaction to hearing that, just picture me banging my head repeatedly against a wall.

Where to start….

First, this sends the absolute wrong message to the player. At some point, the player will wonder why he is not going to the event. If the parents are being honest, they will tell the player, “Well because it is not a game, so it is not important for you to go. We are going to do something else.”

When there are conflicts in schedules and kids have to miss a soccer practice or game, that is completely understandable, but to just choose not to go because it is decided it is not important is a completely different situation.

What message does this send to the player? The only thing that really matters is games. Anything that is not a “real game” or does not count is not important. Is that the message we want to send to kids? If this is the message, it will be difficult to get the players to put forth effort in practice or encourage the them to play and practice on their own. Why would they? It is not important. Why would they waste their time? They will just put effort in and show up when it matters. Only for the games. As that is what has been taught.

Isn't this approach a little backwards? I do not think a parent would tell a child that everything done in the classroom is not important until it is time to take the test. No matter how much effort the child shows or how much he wants to do well on the test, the fact that little effort and importance was given to the preparation for the test, the child will be set up to fail. But that is obvious right? It would be irrational and silly to think the child would do well on the test without proper preparation and learning leading up to it. If the child “skipped” all the unimportant lessons before the test, the test will quickly and harshly show the importance of those lessons.

In my mind, everything that a player does outside of a “real game” is the most important part of their development. It is the preparation and training, the opportunities to improve, that are really the most critical moments for players, and that is what each player needs to understand. And parents need to support that message. Without that message being supported, when kids do compete, they will be unprepared. There will be a lack of ability to play the game, and a lack the ability to compete.

Secondly, kids cannot just show up and want to compete when they think it matters. Competitors do not just compete on game day. We want kids to compete and give their best effort at all times. A message that has a resounding positive impact on all aspects of their lives. You do not just “show up” some of the time. You show up and work hard all the time.

Whether they are playing on their own, at practice, or in a championship game, their effort and focus, should not fluctuate. Competitiveness and drive to do well and have success should be the same no matter what the circumstances. Frankly, it is a mindset that cannot be turned on by just flicking a switch when convenient. The toughest competitors I have ever played with or against played just as hard or harder in training or on their own as they did in the game. Why? They knew it was critical for them to get better, and they needed to develop their ability to compete at all times. When you start picking and choosing when you will do your best, you run the risk of picking and choosing the wrong times. But there is never a wrong time to give your best effort.

As my coach said to me, “When you play, anywhere or at anytime, you never know who is watching, but most importantly, you should always play and compete in a way that makes you proud.”

You cannot expect kids to approach the game, or other things more important than soccer, this way when we start telling them it only matters when a score is recorded, credit is given, or there is some type of reward. In reality, it is every moment leading up to that moment that is much more important, and that is what we hope each child will recognize so they do have success when it counts.

That is the message we want to send kids...that their best effort is always required. It is what life demands of all of us. Do not pick and choose when you can give 25% or 75% effort. If you are going to do it, the effort is always your best. That is a sign of a true competitor, on and off the field, and someone who takes pride in everything thing they do.

I feel most parents want their child to improve and learn how to play the game. If so, why would we label training and playing opportunities designed to help kids improve as “not important” because it is not a real game? If that is the case, why show up to any practice, ask kids to play or practice on their own, or participate in anything with a soccer ball unless it is a game. Unless there is an opposing team, a referee, and the score is going to be recorded for league standings, it is not important or worth your time going is the message being sent.

Obviously this idea, goes way beyond the soccer field. The wrong message is letting kids believe that some aspects of learning or developing any skill are more important than others. When in reality, there are no short cuts, and everything is important. I think this is a key trait of very successful people. They pay attention and give effort at the same level to the small details as they do to the major ones, and in their mind, they probably do not see a difference between the two. If it is a step, even a small one, to help them reach their goal, it is critical and it is approached that way. This is probably why successful people are also labeled as “zealots” in a lot of ways because of their attention and effort to details that most people see as irrelevant or not important. Although it may seem strange to most, true competitors know different and it shows in their results.

Again, this is not a rant about kids missing practice. This is about prioritizing what a player attends because some things are seen as more important than others. Kids will miss practice because families are busy and there are conflicts with other activities. This is not only acceptable, but it should be expected. What was heart breaking about this is that the coach was trying to create a playing opportunity for the kids that will help them get better, and parents made a choice for their kids not to attend because they decided it was not important. Since it was not a real game, it was not important enough to show up. If we want kids to be successful when they compete, then everything leading up to that is important. And that is the right message to send, and one that will help the kids have success in anything they choose to do.

Tony Earp
Tony Earp

Director Tony has a Masters in Education from The Ohio State University, is a State Certified teacher, and is a USSF C License coach. Tony was a standout player both academically and athletically at The Ohio State University, earning multiple honors both on the field and in the classroom. Tony's achievements included 2nd Team All Big Ten in 2001 and 2002, serving as Captain in 2002. Tony was named Most Inspirational Player in 2001 and 2002, as well as achieving Scholar Athlete status in those same years. Tony was a member of the 2002 MLS Draft Pool. After playing, Tony was a history teacher at Licking Valley High School in 2005 and at Dublin Scioto High School in 2006. In 2007, Tony Earp accepted a position at SuperKick as the Director of Soccer Training where he continues to serve as the Senior Director of Training managing programs, establishing training curriculums, and coaching athletes. Tony was the Head Coach for Hilliard Bradley High School boys soccer program in 2009 and 2010. In addition, Tony is a Director for Classics Eagles FC and is the Director of the SuperKick Classics Juniors Academy. With 10 years of coaching experience, Tony has developed a reputation of being a coach who motivates players to expect more from themselves and creates a training environment conducive to developing high level players.

Posted by Administrator on Thu, 28 May 2015
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Team or Club

Does your child identify with being part of a team or a club? Both? In youth soccer, players are normally assigned to teams and they stick with those teams throughout the entire year. Although part of a larger club, the players primarily only interact with the players on their team and their coach. Often, these teams operate independently of other teams within the same age group or the next age group up or down, and rarely have interaction with players outside of their developmental age band or the coaches who work with those groups. Although all players are part of the same club, a player’s experience can be isolated to just a single team or coach.

Unlike clubs in other parts of the world, where players are developed as part of an entire club vision and culture, in the United States, it is more common to find players being developed within the confines of a team or single group of players isolated from others. Does a U10 player in Barcelona’s program see himself as a player on the U10 team or on “Coach Smith’s Team?” Probably not. I am confident the culture and program encourages the player to see himself as part of the club, and as part of an entire program. The player will feel a connection, not just to the players of his age group, but all the players up to the senior team.

If your child is part of a “club”, than the player would identify with not just the players on his team, but would find a sense of family and community among the entire organization. The players get to interact on a consistent basis with other players throughout the club structure. All coaches and players would see each other as responsible for the success of the entire group, not just a single team. They understand they are part of something bigger, a bigger community, which can do more influential things through a larger pool of resources and support, and create more opportunities to help each player develop over the years.

Maybe your child is part of one of the few soccer clubs trying to create this type of environment?

Everything else in youth sports is "team" based so it is hard to get others to see the idea of "team" in a broader perspective. A child's team can be much bigger than just 10 kids. It can be a group of 30 or more of his peers, both boys and girls, and players of different ages and abilities. All can be part of making the season and experience within the club, not only exciting and fun, but developmentally the best learning environment possible for each player.

It is not just beneficial to be able to move kids around into different environments for a variety of developmental opportunities for soccer, but it is required in order to develop a very well rounded and knowledgeable player. That is the purpose and benefit of a club versus a single team. A club can provide more opportunities than a single team can, and to create an organized effort to help the player develop and grow over the years should be the goal of every soccer club. The measure of a great club is not in the number of teams it has. A great club can be measured by the number of experiences and opportunities provided to each player. The only way for a club to provide that is to work as a “club” and not as a number of teams all operating independently from each other.

The ability to move players around and not isolate them to a team has its benefits. I relate it reading groups in the classroom, and the school environment in general when talking to parents about this idea of a “club” versus “team” environment. At the beginning of a school year children are put in a reading group appropriate to their level, but the child is not kept in a particular group the entire year since a child's abilities tend to change. The hope would be the teacher would move kids into different groups, or even different programs, throughout the year, that were appropriate based on a child's growth and development. The teacher would not wait until next school year to move them.

By consistently making sure a child is in the correct group (environment), appropriately challenged and motivated, it is more likely they will not only learn to read, but will show more growth over the year and enjoy it more. Would that not be true when it comes to a child’s soccer development as well?

Also, when it comes to school, we tend to identify with being part of an entire school community versus just being in “Mr. Smith's classroom.” In school, parents and the community see a kid as part of the entire system and hope for outstanding educational experiences within the classroom, but also within the entire school and community, that will support and be part of their child’s growth. Even though a student may spend the majority of his time each year with a particular teacher or group of teachers, there are a lot of experiences outside of the classroom offered as part of their overall educational development.

With that in mind, taking the soccer model from a “team” based to a “club” based model would have the same benefits for kids’ soccer development. Instead of only being with a single coach and a single group of players, can the players have the opportunity to develop with different kids and coaches, in a variety of training and game formats, that are not only fun, but provide a much deeper and more comprehensive approach to their overall soccer development.

Moving outside the soccer specific benefits of a club model over a team model, the social benefits of having a bigger "family" to be a part of are also important to the players. Operating as a club provides more opportunities for the kids to interact and develop relationships with different types of players/kids and to make more friends. When players are isolated on teams, they get stuck in social groups where they have “a role” and normally have certain expectations to live up to. When that social group continues to change, the kids have to continue to redefine their roles based on their environment and the other kids they are playing with. This helps players become not only more confident in a variety of social situations, but gives them diverse opportunities to play different roles within these social groups. In one group, they may be a leader who takes charge, while in another social circle, they may be more supportive in nature while others take charge. It teaches the kids how to be successful in different collaborative environments and how to deal appropriately with diverse personalities.

Being part of a club means a full comprehensive plan from start to finish. The curriculum and development focus is consistent between age groups. The experiences go beyond being part of a single team, but being part of a larger community that all have a vested interest in how one another are doing. With that interest, comes an approach that allows players to be influenced and mentored by many, not just a few. With the diversity in training, experiences, coaches, teammates, friends, and within the community comes an invaluable developmental model that helps to cultivate higher level people who can perform well on any soccer field and in any environment.

Being part of a team is a great experience. Being part of a club can be life changing experience that lasts beyond a child’s playing years.

Tony Earp
Tony Earp

Director Tony has a Masters in Education from The Ohio State University, is a State Certified teacher, and is a USSF C License coach. Tony was a standout player both academically and athletically at The Ohio State University, earning multiple honors both on the field and in the classroom. Tony's achievements included 2nd Team All Big Ten in 2001 and 2002, serving as Captain in 2002. Tony was named Most Inspirational Player in 2001 and 2002, as well as achieving Scholar Athlete status in those same years. Tony was a member of the 2002 MLS Draft Pool. After playing, Tony was a history teacher at Licking Valley High School in 2005 and at Dublin Scioto High School in 2006. In 2007, Tony Earp accepted a position at SuperKick as the Director of Soccer Training where he continues to serve as the Senior Director of Training managing programs, establishing training curriculums, and coaching athletes. Tony was the Head Coach for Hilliard Bradley High School boys soccer program in 2009 and 2010. In addition, Tony is a Director for Classics Eagles FC and is the Director of the SuperKick Classics Juniors Academy. With 10 years of coaching experience, Tony has developed a reputation of being a coach who motivates players to expect more from themselves and creates a training environment conducive to developing high level players.

Posted by Administrator on Thu, 21 May 2015
tags:

Club Fees and Real Cost

Each year when parents are evaluating where their child will play soccer next season, one variable that is always measured is the cost and value of the program. Each club before tryouts lists a “club fee” for each age group. The fee is often different between age groups based on the number of players on each team, league fees, tournament fees, and the coach’s fees. As parents review these fees when comparing different clubs, it is important to remember that they are looking at are just the “club fee” and not the real cost of playing club soccer (in terms of dollars and cents). It is important parents research further to really get an understanding of what is included in that fee and what is not. Only then, will a parent know the true “value” of what is being paid for upfront, and what additional costs are looming in the future.

Travel

For your child’s age group, you should find out where most of their league games and tournaments will be played. As teams get older, even league games require hours of travel and nights in hotels, which can quickly add up the costs for the season. In addition, depending on the level of competition of the team, tournaments can require plane tickets. But even younger teams are traveling more and doing more tournaments. Depending on the number of tournaments or out-of-town games, the cost of the season can significantly increase for each family.

Although these costs are common, knowing before the season begins will help you plan accordingly, or decide if the cost of being with that team is more than you are comfortable spending. From a family and financial standpoint, you may not want to commit all that time traveling or the extra money on hotels, gas, and food, or you understand that is part of the experience and you budget accordingly.

Uniforms

They have to be purchased so this is an unavoidable extra cost for each family. All clubs have different policies on the number of uniforms, shorts, socks that need to be purchased, and if additional items like bags, warm ups, training shirts, and soccer balls are additional costs as well. Some of these items may be included in your fees, while other items are required to be purchased or just optional. Again, having an idea of what the uniform will cost will help you plan ahead. Often, this is the first payments that needs to be made after making a commitment to join the team.

Winter or Supplemental Training

If you live in an area that requires indoor training through the winter, there could be an additional fee for renting space for practice in the winter months when teams cannot train outside. Although some clubs may include this already in their fees, other clubs may not and will charge each player additionally for these sessions. Depending on where you live, if your club has its own facility or not, this extra cost can be harder to plan for, as it usually fluctuates based on the rental rates of a facility and increasing indoor soccer league fees.

There may be also supplemental training during this time of year or throughout the year that is an additional cost. This could be skill training or more specialized training for players in particular positions (Goalkeeper). These programs may be mandatory or optional based on how they are implemented by the club. Again, this is a harder cost to plan for unless it is discussed before the start of the soccer season.

Either way, this is something important to ask about when researching a club. These are some of those “hidden” or “unknown” fees that most parents are not aware of until the time comes to pay them, or these are additional programs already included in your fees for your child that provide more value for your dollar and a better experience.

Additional Coach Fees - Tournament Fees

It is policy with some clubs that parents cover the cost for the travel expenses of the coach for tournaments. This would include the cost of the coach’s meals, hotel, and gas. Although usually a smaller expense, depending on number of tournaments and distance of each, it is another cost per family.

Tournaments may be included in your club’s fees paid throughout the year. This usually includes a certain number of tournaments. But if your child’s team does an extra tournament, or tournaments are not included in your fees, this will be another expense that is divided up among the families of each team. Again, when divided up, it is not a large sum of money, but these smaller expenses can start to add up.

Child’s Equipment

Although a necessary expense, the cost of cleats and other equipment is starting to become a little out of hand. If you have a young child who is growing out of shoes each month, the cost of cleats throughout the year will be a little painful. That on top of the fact some of the more expensive shoes tend to not last very long anyway, you will be spending some money on cleats throughout the year. To save money here, do not over pay for young player's soccer cleats. The more expensive cleats serve little benefit to the players in terms of helping them play. This is an area you can save money by not over paying.

Again, if your child plays in an area that requires indoor soccer through the winter months, than there are indoor soccer shoes (flats) to purchase as well. Although many indoor facilities have instilled turf that players can use regular cleats on, so you may not need those types of shoes.

Then of course, over the year, your child will most likely lose a soccer ball, shin guards, warm up pants, training shirt, jersey, and probably one of those items a second or third time. When the items are lost, they need to be replaced. No matter how responsible your child may be, I would plan on buying more than one of some, or all, of their soccer equipment items.

The Real Cost & Value

As you can see, and probably already know, if you really look at the real cost of playing club soccer, it is much higher than the club fees that are listed at the beginning of the season. There are many extra costs, some avoidable, others not, that parents will need to pay over the course of the season. The key is finding out what those extra costs are before committing to the team, so you can make the best decision possible about if A) this is what you are comfortable paying for your child’s youth soccer experience and B) that you feel there is good value in the money you will spend.

Again, look at what is included in that initial fee. Some clubs will include indoor training and supplemental training within their fees giving more value to what you are already paying. Others will charge extra. Some clubs will include tournaments, others do not include it and charge it later. When comparison shopping, just like any other consumer, you could ask what you are getting for your money and ask for specifics. For example, how many practices each week will your child get with his coach? This will help you determine if you are getting the value that you want for the price you are being asked to pay.

In the end, more than anything, you want your child to have a great experience playing the game he loves. But, part of making sure that happens, is knowing what type of experience that is and how much it is going to cost. Find the soccer club that offers the experience that your child wants at a cost that makes sense and gives you the most value for your money.

Tony Earp
Tony Earp

Director Tony has a Masters in Education from The Ohio State University, is a State Certified teacher, and is a USSF C License coach. Tony was a standout player both academically and athletically at The Ohio State University, earning multiple honors both on the field and in the classroom. Tony's achievements included 2nd Team All Big Ten in 2001 and 2002, serving as Captain in 2002. Tony was named Most Inspirational Player in 2001 and 2002, as well as achieving Scholar Athlete status in those same years. Tony was a member of the 2002 MLS Draft Pool. After playing, Tony was a history teacher at Licking Valley High School in 2005 and at Dublin Scioto High School in 2006. In 2007, Tony Earp accepted a position at SuperKick as the Director of Soccer Training where he continues to serve as the Senior Director of Training managing programs, establishing training curriculums, and coaching athletes. Tony was the Head Coach for Hilliard Bradley High School boys soccer program in 2009 and 2010. In addition, Tony is a Director for Classics Eagles FC and is the Director of the SuperKick Classics Juniors Academy. With 10 years of coaching experience, Tony has developed a reputation of being a coach who motivates players to expect more from themselves and creates a training environment conducive to developing high level players.

Posted by Administrator on Fri, 15 May 2015
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